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MESA Archives: Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC)

(PLEASE NOTE: These web pages are for archival purposes only and are no longer maintained. For current information on this topic at the AFSC visit the Ecosystem Monitoring and Assessment program. )

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Marine Ecology & Stock Assessment
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Bering Sea (BASIS)
Gulf of Alaska (GLOBEC)
Ecosystem Monitoring and Analysis (EMA)
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NOAA Ship Miller Freeman conducted GLOBEC research in the Gulf of Alaska
NOAA Ship Miller Freeman conducted GLOBEC research in the Gulf of Alaska.
 
NOAA Scientists collecting zooplankton samples
NOAA Scientists collecting zooplankton samples

Understanding the processes that regulate early marine survival of salmon is a major goal of the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) Northeast Pacific (NEP) program. Faster growth and larger body size are generally associated with higher marine survival for most species of juvenile salmon, which experience relatively high mortality rates during early marine life. The interaction between the temporal-spatial distribution of juvenile salmon, growth performance, environmental conditions, and stage-specific survival are critical to understanding how physical and biological factors contribute to production and survival, and influence the mechanisms, magnitude, location, and timing of marine mortality.

The northern Coastal Gulf of Alaska (CGOA) is a highly productive, down-welling based system where freshwater runoff and winds dominate the physical processes on the shelf. The physical environment changes at different spatial and temporal scales, which is believed to influence inter-annual variability in distribution, feeding, growth, and survival of juvenile salmon. Pink salmon are the upper trophic level target species of GLOBEC, however, the overarching programmatic goal is to enhance our understanding of the processes driving the physical structure and biological productivity of the highly dynamic CGOA system.


Contact:
Jamal Moss
Auke Bay Laboratories
Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries

Ted Stevens Marine Research Institute
17109 Pt Lena Loop Rd
Juneau AK 99801
(907) 789-6085
Jamal.Moss@noaa.gov

 

Supporting Research

  • Moss, J.H., and D. A. Beauchamp. 2007. Functional response of juvenile pink and chum salmon: effects of consumer size and two types of prey. Journal of Fish Biology 70: 1-13.

  • Moss, J.H., D.A. Beauchamp, A.D. Cross, E.V. Farley, J.H. Helle and, K.W. Myers. 2007. Spatial patterns in consumption demand and growth potential of juvenile pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) in the Gulf of Alaska. North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission Technical Report 7: 35-36.

  • Moss, J.H., D.A. Beauchamp, A.D. Cross, K.W. Myers, E.V. Farley, Jr., J.M. Murphy, and J.H. Helle.
    2005. Higher marine survival associated with faster growth for pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 134:1313-1322.

  • Armstrong, J.L., J.L. Boldt, A.D. Cross, J.H. Moss, N.D. Davis, K.W. Myers, R.V. Walker, D.A. Beauchamp, and L.J. Haldorson. 2005. Distribution, Size and Interannual, Seasonal and Diel Food Habits of the Northern Gulf of Alaska Juvenile Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). Deep-Sea Research II 52(1-2): 247-265.

  • Cross, A.D., D.A. Beauchamp, J.L. Armstrong, M. Blikshteyn, J.L. Boldt, N.D. Davis, L.J. Haldorson, J.H. Moss, K.W. Myers, and R.V. Walker. 2005. Consumption demand of juvenile pink salmon in Prince William Sound and the coastal Gulf of Alaska in relation to prey biomass. Deep Sea Research II 52(1-2): 347-370.


See the publications and posters databases for additional listings.


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